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We got our hands on an email from a Google recruiter that reveals interview secrets

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We stumbled upon an email from a Google recruiter highlighting what to expect in the interview for a product management candidate. We read through it all and put the best part below:

 

Product Management Position Overview:

 

What to Expect

Cultural fit. Google PMs dream of the next moonshot idea. They lead and influence effectively They have a bias for action and get things done. If Google PMs were working anywhere else, they’d probably be CEOs of their own company. Sample questions to assess cultural fit:
Why Google?
Why PM?

Technical. Google PMs lead product development teams. To lead effectively, PMs must have influence and credibility with engineers. During the final round (aka onsite) interview, a senior member of the engineering team will evaluate your technical competence Be prepared for whiteboard coding questions at the onsite interview Example questions include:
Write an algorithm that detects meeting conflicts.

Strategy. Google PMs are business leaders. As a result, they must be familiar with business issues. It’s not necessary for PMs to have business experience or formal business training. However, they do expect you to pick up business intuition and judgment quickly. Sample interview questions include:
If you were Google’s CEO, would you be concerned about Microsoft?
Should Google offer a StubHub competitor? That is, sell sports, concert, and theater tickets?
Also be prepared for behavioral interview questions such as Tell me a time when you had to influence engineering to build a particular feature. Google PM interviewers are relying more on behavioral interview questions in recent months.

 

What Not to Expect

Brain teasers, such as logic puzzles, are rarely used in today’s Google PM interviews. Google’s HR department found a low correlation between job performance and a candidate’s ability to solve brain teasers Examples of brain teasers include:

I roll two dice. What is the probability that the 2nd number is greater than the 1st?
What’s 27 x 27 without using a calculator or paper?
However, hypothetical questions have not been banned at all. Hypothetical questions are imaginary situations that ARE related to the job. (This is in contrast with brain teasers, which ARE NOT related to the job.) Examples of hypothetical questions include How would you design an algorithm to source data from the USDA and display on Google nutrition?

 

How to Prepare

Here’s what I’d recommend to get ready for the Google PM interview:

Review tech blogs, such as Stratechery.

Product design. Practice leading design discussions using a framework. (Need a framework? Try CIRCLES Method: http://qr.ae/i6kRM). Start with possible personas and detail use cases. Prioritize use cases and brainstorm solutions. Many PM candidates (wrongly) suggest solutions that are incremental or derivatives of a competitor’s feature set. The Google interviewers are evaluating your creativity, and they place a big emphasis on big ideas (aka “moonshots”). Inspire them with unique, compelling ideas. Drawing wireframes on a whiteboard will help illustrate your ideas. To practice, download a wireframing tool like Balsamiq. Also study popular web and mobile design patterns for inspiration.

Technical. Coding questions are unlikely during the phone interviews. But if you are invited to an on-site interview, you must prepare for programming interviews. The technical interviewer does not expect your programming syntax to be perfect, but you should have sufficient mastery of technical concepts so that you can participate in technical discussions and help make technical trade-offs. I would recommend going over computer science fundamentals and practicing a couple coding questions One of my favorite resources is How to Ace the Software Engineering Interview Also be prepared to describe key technologies including search engines, machine learning, and MapReduce.

Analytical. Prepare for estimation questions such as How many queries per second does Gmail get? Get well-versed in product launch metrics and A/B testing, including interpretation of results.

Strategy. Use a framework to structure your strategy discussions If you’re not familiar with strategy or frameworks, Porter’s Five Forces is a good start.

Cultural fit. Understand what it means to be Googley by reading Google’s corporate philosophy. Review Google’s Android design principles. Optional readings: Google’s visual asset guidelines and Steven Levy’s 2007 (but still useful) article on the Google APM program Another optional, but more in-depth (and recent) perspective, read Steven Levy’s “In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives.”

 

Source: Business Insider 

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